Tuesday, 15 October 2013

STARDAY RECORDS 704

FUZZY WHITENER with Jerry Dykes and his band
Mar 58
704A - Why Do I Love You   (Starrite BMI)
(Whitener)
704B - Sugar Buggar   (Starrite BMI)
(Whitener)
STARDAY 704

Source: Terry Gordon






Saturday, 12 October 2013

PEACH RECORDS 703

LEWIS PRUITT and the True Lads
Mar 58  (BMI Clearance on 5th May 1958)
CP-1460 - I'm In A Daze   (Golden State)
(Bobby Dood)
CP-1461 - Pretty baby   (Giolden State)
(Lewis Pruitt)
PEACH 703
Box 111, Jefferson, GA

After the last few records reviewed on this site, I'd like to say there is not much disputing that this record IS a Starday Custom and fits in with the listing. Rite numbers are earlier that the Cowtowns or Beverly. Trouble is, Peach started a numbering series about this time in a rather sloppy manner - a couple of 500 series years apart for example, so perhaps we shouldn't take it for granted :-)
"Pretty Baby" is a good rocker. 

This is Neil Scott's version of a mint record. In fact, as he "downgrades" his records sometimes, the rumour that this was a mint copy until he put the sanding machine on it has yet to be proven. Though, to mimic our scummy UK journalists - "I've said it so it must be true."

Source: Neil Scott






Wednesday, 9 October 2013

TRAILS RECORDS 702

BILLY SAGE

A - Untie These Chains

B - Everybody's Crazy About Me

TRAILS RECORDS 702

Described as a "Fun, lightweight little hillbilly-bopper/western swing four piece. Not rockabilly, but in the ballpark. On one of Starday's boutique labels."

Anybody got a copy of this? I'd like to see it to see if it's a Starday Custom.

 

COWTOWN RECORDS ep 702

GENE RAY
May 58
CP-1557 - Oklahoma Waltz
               A Picture Of You
CP-1558 - Indigo Blue
              Learning The Mambo
COWTOWN ep 702
Po Box 192, Avery, TX   (John Stephenson)

This was pressed even further away than Beverly 701. I can't seem to locate my label shots for this but I seem to remember both sides were at least mostly Starrite BMI. More of a continuation of Cowtown Records than anything else, Starday could have still been paid to press this (and again sending it to Rite). 

You think this is confusing - wait until I get to Brite Star!

Monday, 7 October 2013

BEVERLY RECORDS 702

THE KOOL TOPPERS
Apr / May 1958
CP-1535 - Is That Exactly What You wanta Do   (Golden State Songs)
(Unknown)
CP-1536 - Cause I Love You So   (Golden State Songs)
(Unknown)
BEVERLY 702
Kinson, NC

Like Cowtown 701, there's a general opinion that this fits as part of the Starday Custom series. However, this was pressed even later that Cowtown 701 - this came after Big State 718, which leaves some the believe this isn't really a true custom, rather a follow up for Beverly 701 (Anyone got info on this?)

Personally, despite it being pressed a couple of months out of sequence, it doesn't mean it isn't one. But I'm willing to be persuaded either way. Both sides published by Golden State which is a good sign.

I did have label shots for both sides, but it was from a bootleg. I've used Michel Proosts label shot from his blog "That's All Rite Mama" as (I'm hoping) this is a shot of a real copy. (Well, at least it looks more real than the boot does.) The boot 45 came with a picture sleeve -  I don't know if the original did.

Source: Michel Proost



Saturday, 20 July 2013

STARDAY RECORDS 701

LOU WALKER
Apr 58 
45-701-A - Little Bitty Man
(Walker)   (Starrite BMI)
45-701-B - Cause I'm Losing You
(Walker)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY 701

Source: Terry Gordon




Monday, 15 July 2013

COWTOWN RECORDS ep 701

JOHN STEPHENSON and the Texans
Apr /May 58
CP-1494 - Was I Borned To Lose     (Starrite BMI)
(J W Stephenson / Mary M Miller)
               Sweeter Day By Day     (Starrite BMI)
(Mary M Miller)
CP-1495 - The Truth Hurts
               I Was Warned.
COWTOWN 701
Po Box 192, Avery, TX   (John Stephenson)

Now - conundrum time. Is this a Starday Custom pressing and does it fit in with this listing? Well, after every London Record Fair at Great Portland Street, the weary collectors, sellers and dodgy geezers with notebooks and plastic carrier bags full of beaten up 45's (sounds a lot like me, except for the carrier bag), get together in the local pub / bar / watering hole and talk rubbish for an hour of two, usually about records. (It's a bit like fishing stories - the "One That Got Away" and "I Used To Own That But Not Anymore"). Anyhooo, as most of the contributors of this listing seem to drink together, especially on the rare occasion Phil Tricker blows the dust off of his wallet, flits away the moths and gets the beers in, the talk usually steers towards Starday Customs. (Don't often see Ian Saddler in there, but he's usually behind his stall counting his money).

The general consensus is:- (cue trumpets or drums) that it was probably sent to Starday for pressing and Starday farmed off the duties to Rite in Cincinnati. The Rite numbers are a little ahead of March 1958, but Rite wouldn't despatch until payment was received. (This was pressed after the Starday Custom 712 - Jesse Stevens). So in theory it is one. But others stammer and yell that, as there is already a bonefide 701 (Lou Walker on Starday), then it's probably not part of this series and simply a Starday / Rite pressed follow up to Cowtown 700. Whatever, I've included it anyway. It's covered with Starrite Publishing and it almost fits datewise. You know it's not like DNA sequencing - there's probably not a true "order" of things except the fact that the listing is numerical. Feel free to leave your comments and I'll add them to this page - unless of course it's simply to tell me it isn't one without some kind of explanation.

John Stephenson and his Cowtown label was sometimes part of the "Song Poem" legacy. 

Source: Udo Frank / Dan DeClark




Sunday, 14 July 2013

STARDAY RECORDS 700

TEX TURNER
58
700-A - Why Not Honey
700-B - (Unknown)
STARDAY 700

One of the many mysteries regarding Starday Customs is this one. In 30 years I have never seen this record, heard it or even know anybody who has a copy. BUT ...... a Spanish collector, who's opinion I tend to value, says he has heard this record back in the 70s or 80's and it does indeed (obviously) exist. He described it as a "little like Truitt Forse" which is high praise indeed!

I have also seen this listed as having Lou Walker on the flip side - both sides of the Starday 701 release. No idea where this comes from either. 

Perhaps anybody else can fill in any blanks on this record? 

14 Jul 2013 - Update.

To correct my last statement, the collector I mentioned had NOT heard or seen this record. Apparently, a french collector heard this track at Don Pierces' office and that it was on a (possible) acetate and probably unissued. To confound matters, when asked about the record years later, he denied he'd ever heard it, despite actually sending a letter to another collector to announce what he'd just heard at Dons. Time can play tricks on us all I guess. (I can't remember who I am most mornings). A collector even hired a private detective in the 70's to try and find a Tex Turner but drew a blank. (I have omitted the names of the collectors as they have not given me permission to use their names in this.)

Another note I found which I had written back in the 80's was that Tex Turner was a pseudonym for another artist and may have appeared on a Dixie ep. Where I got that snippet from is anybody's guess as I never wrote down my sources until the 90's (and by then it was too late to remember some of them).

 I love a mystery - as long as I can have the answers at the end!

Sunday, 23 June 2013

COWTOWN RECORDS 700

HARRY PEPPEL and his Shenandoah Valley Rangers
(Side A by Tommy Donohue)  (Side B by Dick Dorn)
Mar 58
CP-1444 - One Night's Love  (Starrite BMI)
              Oh My Aching Head   (Stephenson Music)
CP-1445 - Thermostat baby   (Starrite BMI)
              Old Fashioned Waltz   (Starrite BMI)
COWTOWN 700
Po Box 1694, Ft Worth, TX  (JW Stephenson)

Another Rite pressed Starday Custom. JW Stephenson owned Cowtown Records which dabbled in Song/Poems and self-financed record releases on the label, as well as taking a punt on a few with his own money. Cowtown issued some fine music here and there. Label based around Avery, TX, although here Fort Worth is mentioned as the address. The Dick Dorn sides are especially nice on this EP.
Harry Peppel is a mystery to me - although I am informed his name appears on a few more records dotted around the US, but I have no details at present. (He does appear on an earlier Cowtown release in this series.)

I have to mention that there is another contender for the #700 spot - see next post - but with the Rite information, the dating of this record seems to fit in the listing quite nicely.

Source: Terry Gordon




Wednesday, 5 June 2013

STARDAY RECORDS 699

BILL JOHNSON and the Dabblers
Mar 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st May 1958. )
45-699-A - Lonesome Daddy Blues
(Johnson)   (Starrite BMI)
45-699-B - Umm Boy, You’re My Baby
(Johnson)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 699
(Unknown Location - possibly KY)

Source: Terry Gordon




PLAYBOY RECORDS 698

PLEZ GARY MANN
Mar 58  (Billboard review on 5th May 1958.)
BMI Clearance on  30th April 1958.
CP-1442 - Cheer me Up
(Mann)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1443 - I Want To be True
(Mann)   (Starrite BMI)
PLAYBOY RECORDS 698
Yolyn, WV

Source: Neil Scott




BLUE SKY RECORDS 697

JEANIE CHRISTIE with Earl Durrance and the Blue Sky Boys
Feb 58   (Reviewed on Country Music Round-Up on 22 Sept 58.)
CP-1438 - Flying High
(J Christie / E Durrance)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1439 - Sunshine
(J Christie / E Durrance)   (Starrite BMI)
BLUE SKY RECORDS 697
Box 381, St Cloud, FL
Label owned by Earl Durrance. 

Source: Al Turner




STARDAY RECORDS 696

JOHNNY TOOLEY
Feb 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
45-696-A - King Of Dreams
(Bobby Anderson)   (Starrite BMI)
45-696-B - Looking Glass Heart
(Bobby Anderson)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 696
(Artist based in KY)
(Pressed for Bill Anderson, owner of Summit Records, Central City, KY.)

Source: Lars Lundgren




STAR RECORDS 695

DAYTON HARP and his Dixieland Drifters  with Dot Anderson (pno)
Feb 58   (BMI Clearance on 30th April 1958.)
CP-1434 - Man Crazy Woman
(Harp)   (Golden State BMI)
CP-1435 - You’re One In A Million
(Harp)   (Golden State BMI)
STAR RECORDS 695
1148 Oak Hill St, Lakeland, FL.
(Vcls on CP-1434 is by Dayton Harp and Dot Anderson.)

Source: Phillip J Tricker




STARDAY RECORDS 694

TAYLOR PORTER
Feb 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
45-694-A - It’s Over Now
(Porter)   (Starrite BMI)
45-694-B - No More Lovin’ You
(Porter)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 694
(Unknown Location)

Source: Lars Lundgren






VALLEY RECORDS 693

DALE ANDERSON
Jan 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958)
CP-1411 - You’ll Never Know
(D Anderson / D Thomason)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1412 - Long way To Go
(D Thomason / S Harrington)   (Starrite BMI)
VALLEY RECORDS 693
Radio WCYB, Bristol, VA.

Source: Lars Lundgren





DIXIE RECORDS 692

J C SAWYER / HOWARD BINGHAM and the Rockets
Dec 57   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
CP-1391 - Goin’ Steppin’
(Kenneth Ellis)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1392 - Baby Love
(Howard Bingham)   (Starrite BMI)
DIXIE RECORDS 692
(Unknown Location)
(The date above reflects the possibility that, despite the issue no. of 692, this was pressed  before Mystic 689 and Listen 690 and 691.)

Source: Steve Holloway






LISTEN RECORDS 691

AL SIMS and the Alpine Two
Jan 58
CP-1409 - Eskimo Sweetheart
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1410 - Party
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
LISTEN RECORDS 691
Box 6601, Roswell, NM.
(CP-1410 is a different take to the version on LISTEN 681.)

Source: Neil Scott




LISTEN RECORDS 690

AL SIMS and the Alpine Two
Jan 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
CP-1407 - Your Love Is A Prison
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1408 - Little Red Caboose
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
LISTEN RECORDS 690
Box 6601, Roswell, NM.

Source: Terry Gordon




MYSTIC RECORDS 689

BILL GOODWIN
Jan 58    (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
CP-1405 - Angel In Disguise
(Gene Hopkins / Earl Brewster / Bill White)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1406 - It Don’t Cost A Dime To Dream
(Gene Hopkins / Bill Goodwin)   (Starrite BMI)
MYSTIC RECORDS 689
Cannon City, CO

Source: Lars Lundgren




STARDAY RECORDS 688

BOB and CINDY DEAN
Jan 58   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958)
688-A - Long Time Gone
(Dean)   (Starrite BMI)
688-B - Gone For Another
(John Hammer / Joan Dassau)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 688
(Unknown Location)

Sopurce: Phillip J Tricker / John Burton




FARRALL RECORDS 687

JIMMIE DALE
Dec 57   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1957.)
CP-1383 - Man Made Moon
(Murrell Farmer / Thomas Allen)   (Starrite BMI)
CP-1384 - For A Day
(Murrell Farmer / Thomas Allen)   (Starrite BMI)
FARRALL RECORDS 687
1834 Nelligan Ave, Louisville 3, KY.

Source: Lars Lundgren




STARDAY RECORDS 686

LLOYD McCULLOUGH
Dec 57   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
45-686-A - Half My Fault
(McCullough / Bond)   (Starrite BMI)
45-686-B - What Can I Tell Them
(Bond / McCullough)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 686
(Unknown Location - possibly Nashville, TN)

Source: Terry Gordon

Born Lloyd Arnold McCollough, 25 June 1935, Memphis, Tennessee
Died 10 January 1976, Memphis, Tennessee
Lloyd was born as Lloyd Arnold McCollough, 25 June 1935, Memphis, TN and was of Irish descent. Whilst in High School, Lloyd was contemplating a career in baseball but the death of Hank Williams made him decide that perhaps singing would be a better option. By 1952 he was playing locally for family and friends and formed his first band – The Drifting Hillbillies. They recorded some tracks for Sam Phillips at the fames Sun Studios but nothing was released.
Finally, Lloyd got a record deal with the tiny VON label located in Booneville, MS. Both sides were probably classed as “Out-And-Out Hillbilly / Country music, but his feel for what Elvis Presley had been doing was already evident – even if Lloyd wasn’t trying to become a rock & roller at this stage. A quick change of labels (as Von had virtually no distribution) was the EKKO label where he recorded two more polished (and more country sounding) sides. By then, Country was taking a back seat to Rock & Roll and Lloyd saw an opportunity to get on the bandwagon to promote himself whilst keeping to his country roots. His recordings for the Nashville REPUBLIC Records became a classic example of Rock-A-Billy, even if it only caused a few ripples in the pond of R&R. With Bill Helms cranking out some great licks through an amp the size of a postage stamp and Lloyd growling like a man possessed, it was probably too loud and wild for much radio play.
Sometime after these recordings, he hitched up with his band at a recording studio and recorded these two sides. It took 6-8 months before they saw the light of day on Starday Records, but many would say it was worth the wait. Both sides co-written by Eddie Bond, Lloyd managed to belt out two fine sides – showing his vocal dept to the late, great Hank Williams whilst keeping up with those teenage rockers that were appearing out of everywhere. sadly, by the time this disc was released, R&R was beginning to burn out and teen idols seemed to be taking over. Lloyd was never going to be able to compete with the slicked-out artists like Paul Anka.
By this time Lloyd had changed the name of his band to the Rockin' Drifters. While working on the East Coast, as Lloyd was continually hitting the road with his band, he met up with Savoy Records' Herman Lubinsky – a shrewd yet successful label owner. Herman cut six songs with him, but only two were released, on Savoy's subsidiary label, Sharp. The instrumental "Dixie Doodle" (Sharp 108, 1960) was the first record to be credited to "Lloyd Arnold", as he now called himself. In late 1960, Lloyd recorded (probably in Philadelphia) another great rocker, "Red Coat, Green Pants and Red Suede Shoes" (Myers 113). Coupled with the equally strong "Hangout”. The disc did nothing more than get a little local attention and a record to sell at gigs. A much wilder version of Hangout was released on KATCHEE records (possibly before the MYERS disc.)
Lloyd also recorded a few singles for the MEMPHIS Label, owned by Buford Cody and also recorded for K-ARK, MILLIONAIRE and a slew of smaller labels. Leaving R&R behind, he went back to country, whilst some of his Memphis Recordings were pretty darn good and bordering on R&R. But by 1976 Lloyd was having many problems and he sadly took his own life.

Lloyd is an artist who I feel - had been born a few years earlier – could have ridden the coat tails of Hank Williams and maybe even landed on the MGM label as he had that kind of southern drawl in his vocals that could’ve sold records and got more radio play. But whilst he never really made it as an artist nationally, he left behind some great recordings. 




STARDAY RECORDS 685

GENE SCARBOROUGH
Dec 57   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
45-685-A - Wanted
(Scorbrough)   (Starrite BMI)
45-685-B - Lonesome For Someone
(Scarbrough)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 685
(Unknown Location)

Source: Phillip J Tricker

Gene was possibly an Ohio artist – based on three of his four (known to me) singles having Ohio addresses. Cashbox (24 Jan 59) mentions that Clay Eager – former WLW-NBC TV and Radio emcee who also appeared on the “Homespun” show, Boone County Jamboree, Midwestern Hayride and often seen on stage at the famed Renfro Valley Barn Dance (plus WWVA Jamboree and occasionally the “Opry”) had become the producer, Director and emcee of the WMNI-Jamboree – which featured as its regular cast – Echo valley Folks / The Crawford Bros. / Jimmy Williams / Jimmie John / Ray Anderson / The Pine Mountain Boys (and others) and a certain Gene Scarborough. Gene also appeared on the Ohio State Country Round-Up which was presented each Saturday at the Ohio State Fairgrounds. Gene was booked through an agent called Miss McConnell who was based in Columbus, OH.


The A side is a nice up-tempo country disc with a fine band behind him. He’s got a good country voice – so much so that Don Pierce elected to issue it on the Starday imprint. Flip is slower and the band aren’t quite as together as they were on the top side. Still, a nice enough effort and both sides probably got a bit of radio airplay and jukebox coins. After 1964, I lose sight of Mr. Scarborough. He recorded for Forney Crace’s tiny Hark Label from Marion, OH (Bluest One In Town / Running Away From Love); Brock Records from Columbus, OH (Please Answer Me / A Dream of You) and, weirdly, the Del-Ray label from Harrington, Delaware (It All Depends On Linda / Think Twice Before You Go). 




STARDAY RECORDS 684

MAY HAWKS
Dec 57  (Billboard review on 27th January 1958.)
45-684-A - Talk A Little Louder
(May Hawks / Les Thomas)   (Starrite BMI)
45-684-B - Forever And A Day
(May Hawks / Les Thomas)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 684
(Artist based in Flint, MI)

Source: Lars Lundgren

Born in Cookeville, TN on 16thJune 1921, Lily Mae Gibson was the sixth child in a somewhat musical family. Her first public appearance was with her sister Leone at a schoolhouse at nearby Algood and by the 1940’s, she was performing over WHUB in Cookeville.

May married a friend of Leona’s husband and moved to Troy, MI, as her husband, Robert Hawks worked there at the Chrysler Plant. Attending a show featuring local band leader Casey Clark and Little Jimmy Dickens, she was asked to sing – which led to a spot on WKNX in Saginaw, MI. After a brief stint in Nashville as part of the “Martha White Biscuit and Cornbread Time” show, she stayed in Troy and began working with Casey Clark, appearing on the Big Barn Frolic based in Highland Park, whilst having her own daily show over WJR.

By 1952, she was contacted by Jack and Devora Brown – owners of the famed Fortune Record Co. from Detroit. Sending her off to the Universal Studios, she cut “Jealous Love” (also covered by the Davis Sisters). (“Jealous Love” / “Year After Year” – FORTUNE 173). Two more discs followed before she moved onto Don Large’s Horizon Label (where she was billed as the “Teenessee Thrush”). Then she did another duet with Lester (Les) Thomas for the North Hollywood Coin label. (Lester also duetted on some Fortune Recordings).

Which brings us to this recording – her last duet with Les. As she was very popular in Detroit and the surrounding areas, Don Pierce decided to issue this on Starday Records, as he saw sales potential for the record.

“Talk A Little Louder” is an amusing ditty of being together whilst ignoring the plea from the other to settle down. Backed by some fine musicians, the tune rolls along nicely. Flip is slower – but vocally she’s on top form. There are shades of a young Patsy Cline vocally.

May continued singing passed this recording before eventually moving back to Cookville, TN. She was elected to the Michigan Country Music Hall Of Fame in 1997 and passed away on 4thNovember 2010.


For a fuller (and much better written) history of her career, go out and purchase Detroit Country Music by Craig Maki and Keith Cady – a book full of amazing information and anecdotes on and from the many talented musicians that performed around the Detroit, MI area. (The chapter on Ford Nix is work the price on it’s own!)




STARDAY RECORDS 683

KELLY BROTHERS (Abner and Newt)
Nov 57   (BMI Clearance on 31st March 1958.)
45-683-A - Flying Saucers
(A Kelly / N Kelly)   (Starrite BMI)
45-683-B - Hero
(A Kelly / N Kelly)   (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 683
(Unknown Location)

Source: Neil Scott

Abner and Newt Kelly hailed from Pelzer, SC which is around 15 miles away from Greeneville. Although their early musical experience was singing Gospel songs (which they continued to do so after this record), and performing either with or alongside the famed Blue Ridge Quartet, they hit the vinyl airwaves with this excellent 45, which Don Pierce saw promise in and placed it on the Starday Imprint.

After this disc, I lose their career for a few years. They had a release on Embrace Records (from their home town) and an LP on Majestic Records which is gospel. The Kelly brothers on Excello, Sims, Federal and Nashville are not related to this duo.


“Flying Saucers” is a nice hillbilly-cum-bluegrass ditty which claims that UFO’s are from God. Nice strong vocals from the Abner and Newt.




UNKNOWN LABEL 682

(UNKNOWN ARTIST)
Nov 57
45-682-A - (No info)
(No info)   (No info)
45-682-B - (No info)
(No info)   (No info)
UNKNOWN RECORD LABEL 682
(Unknown Location)



Whoops! Somehow this record hasn’t managed to sneak up on me and let itself be known! It was mentioned once during a beer break at a record fair that this was released on REED Records from Birmingham, AL – but then again, he wasn’t sure. (I used to write everything down religiously, however far-fetched it seemed. at the time) But Phil Tricker probably has the best Reed collection I have ever seen and he doesn’t have it (or not heard of it either) so perhaps it’s just a rumour. I usually find that some collectors state a record exists or hands out a snippet of info just to seem to be in the know. I’m sure if Phil knew about it he’d be turning over every rock looking for it. Could be the REED label from Castille, NY that Bill Loop appeared on instead (801 and 802). But then again, it might not be on Reed at all!

LISTEN RECORDS 681

AL SIMS and the Alpine Two
Nov 57  (BMI Clearance on 31st January 1958.)
45-681-A - Party
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
45-681-B - Girl Without A Heart
(Sims)   (Starrite BMI)
LISTEN RECORDS 681
Box 6601, Roswell, NM.

Source: Terry Gordon



Born 17thJan 1932 and one of 6 children, Al was brought up on a farm near Santa Rosa, NM. Whilst serving in the US Navy, he decided he wanted to learn the guitar, so he purchased one from a local pawn shop.
After his service (with stints on the Korean peninsula), he returned to the US and enrolled at a state university in Alpine, TX. 
Al had written some songs and learnt some chords on the guitar, so he formed a band and gigged locally, supporting artists like Johnny Horton and Roy Orbison and The Teen Kings.
In January 1957, Al and his band found themselves at Norman Petty’s Studio in Clovis, NM to cut a record. (“Love That Lives Forever” / “Hard Working Man” – SUNSHINE 11075). Although he managed to either sell or hand out quite a few, he still only continued to gig locally or end up near the bottom of shows in the line-up. But the band practised as much as they could and were getting better all the time.

This leads up to his next record. I’m guessing that “Party” was aimed at the Rock-A-Billy end of the musical spectrum, whilst the flip was leaning towards the country end. Booking some time at Radio KVLF in Alpine, TX (where his university was), Al and his band (Don Powell on Ld Gtr and Bud Turner on Bass) set up and got themselves ready to record two titles that he had penned. Now “Party” has a real “Back-In-The-Hills” quality to it, mainly due to what can only be described as a somewhat muddy recording. Don’s lead guitar is quite upfront on the recording which leaves Al’s vocals a little behind in the mix. (Can barely hear the bass at all). The recordings don’t get any cleared for the flip-side either. Al’s vocals are up a bit in the mix but the lead guitar still drowns him out a bit. 


I’m guessing that Al wasn’t that happy with the recordings as about 4 months later, he recorded Party again (with a different flip-side). We’ll be hearing from him again in nine records time. One more thing of note, according to Phil Tricker and Dick Grant (who wrote an article on Al for the Rockin’ Fifties magazine – written or translated into German! – (My German is pretty poor), they mention in the discography that there is an un-named steel guitarist on these sides. If there is, I can’t hear him/her at all!! Now, if Phil Tricker told me the guitarist was John Lee Hooker and the band was the Johnny Otis Orch, I’d take it for granted that he knew something I didn’t. But I still can’t hear it! (Maybe Al told them there was one present.) Maybe he went out for a cigarette break and missed it all J





CEDAR RECORDS 680

SLIM FOSTER and his Cedar Valley Boys
Nov 57
45-680-A - (No info)
(No info)   (No info)
45-680-B - Singin’ Guitar
(Slim Foster)   (Starrite BMI)
CEDAR RECORDS 680
(Unknown Location)

Source: Michel Proost / Ebay

Can’t pretend I know almost anything about Slim Foster. No location on the label to give us at least a mild clue as to where he came from. Obviously never gave any thought to some tired old Englishman trying to piece together a box set about 60 years after the record hit the streets! (61 to be exact)

Anyhow, Although I’m quite partial to the sound of the recordings, Slim seems to be singing without much gusto – (not surprising as the A side is a ballad). But the flip isn’t much better – fairly okay is probably my description. But something must have made Slim think he had what is takes to grab some jukebox coin of some airplay as a few months after this, he released another one! Confusingly, it appeared as CEDAR 681 which, until I set my eyes on this record, would have clashed with the next Starday Custom by Al Sims, But 681 was pressed by Southern Plastics (although billed as a Starday Custom on 45cat. – SO: 327/8).
(This one sounds like it was recorded at the same session and a little livelier than 680.) 681 was also reissued as K-ARK 613.

In 1962, we find Slim with the Glaser Brothers (Tompall, Dick and Jim) on NASHVILLE Records (5080 and 5135). Then there’s an LP on PUME Records (possibly a 70’s release). After that (or indeed before), I know nothing.


A few collectors suggest both Cedar Recordings were recorded in Nashville, TN.