Thursday, 26 November 2009

MOVIE CRAFT RECORDS 566

MOVIE CRAFT 566
930 West 7th Place, Los Angeles 17, CA
ROD BURTON - Moviecraft Orchestra
ROD BURTON and GWEN REYNOLDS - Moviecraft Orchestra
Jun 56
566-A - I'd Like To Be A Baby Sitter
(Morris-Gerard) (Golden State Songs BMI)
566-B - "I'm Dolling You Up For" Somebody Else
(Morris-Gerard) (Golden State Songs BMI)

The only info we had on this disc was a black acetate. No labels, no info, just the info in the dead wax. Now, after close to 20 years, here at last is the disc! I'm not going to pretend I know too much about the song-poem legacy of some artists, but Rod Burton's name crops up occasionally on obscure labels from God-Knows-Where. If there's anybody out there that can fill in some details on him, I'd be more than willing to add it. 


As for the music, I'm just waiting for the MP3s to arrive to compare them to the acetate (Just in case they're a little different) and I'll be able to tell you more. Well, probably not MUCH more, but just enough.


A huge thanks to Toms Sims who found a copy of the disc.
Feel free to Email me! with any other info on the label or artist.






Tom Sims




Tom Sims

STARDAY RECORDS 565

STARDAY RECORDS 565
(artist based in Quincy, KY)
LUKE GORDON and his Lonesome Drifters
May 56 (BMI clearance on 15th Jun 56)(Recorded Apr 56)
ST-565-A Big New Dance
(L Gordon) (Starrite BMI)
ST-565-B Just Doin' What's Right
(Unknown Credits) (Starrite BMI)

Another fine offering by the excellent Luke Gordon. The A side (to me) fully embraces the new music style that was frequently pushing aside country music at the time, whilst staying true to his musical roots. The band once again are excellent. Once again, Luke ventured to Ben Adelman's cool little studio on Cedar Street in Washington DC to record these tracks. I haven't heard the flip side as yet, nor have I seen the record. (MC)

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STARDAY RECORDS 564






























STARDAY RECORDS 564
 (Possibly a Tennessee Artist)
TEX DIXON
May 56 (BMI clearance on 15th Jun 56)
45-564-A - Your Lovin' Lies
(Jimmie Atkins / Walter Dickey) (Starrite BMI)
45-564-B - I'm Just Feeling Sorry For Myself
(Jimmie Atkins / Walter Dickey) (Starrite BMI)

Although I pretty much know almost nothing about this artist, he was pretty prolific during the 50's and early 60's. His real name was Walter Dee Dickey and he recorded under the name Mason Dixon for Reed Records, Walter Dixon on Erwin Records and Tex Dixon on this release and also on Zone and Stompertime Records from Memphis, TN. He was a regular on the Dixie Hayride (Florence, AL). Walter was blessed with a voice that could do stone-cold country and Rock-A-Billy in a blink of an eye. Both tunes here were co-wrote by Jimmie Atkins, an artist she shared billing with on a 45rpm on Alfa Records. Both sides represented here are similar, heartbreaking hillbilly songs with steel guitar being the main instrument.

According to Martin Hawkins, (who wrote the excellent sleeve notes for the ACE CD "The Complete Meteor Recordings" (ACE CDCH2 885)),the Mason Dixon who recorded for Meteor Records ("Don't Worry 'Bout Nuthin'" / "I'll Never fall Out Of Love With You") was Merle "Red" Taylor and not the above artist. They sound pretty similar to me and if I hadn't read the CD booklet I'd have presumed they were the same guy. As an added thread of confusion, Red also appeared on the Dixie Hayride, although under his real name. (MC/ Al Turner / Terry Gordon / CD sleeve notes by Martin Hawkins.)

Label Shots courtesy of Al Turner. Artist Photo courtesy of Terry Gordon.
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STARDAY RECORDS 563



















STARDAY RECORDS 563
HOYT SCOGGINS and the Saturday Nite Jamboree Boys
May 56 (BMI clearance on 15th Jun 56)
45-563-A Why Did We Fall In Love
(Scoggins) (Starrite BMI)
45-563-B Tennessee Rock
(Scoggins) (Starrite BMI)

Having not heard the A side, I make up for it with having the B side all lined up for me to swoon over. Not the usual gospel stuff, just a clear stab at breaking into this new fangled "Cat Music." He sounds a little unsure of himself while he's wailing away at this type of music but it's a winner of a song. Band provide good support (as Billboard would say). (MC)

Label Shot courtesy of Terry Gordon.
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GIBSON RECORDS 562













GIBSON RECORDS 562
(No Location)
KING STERLING
May 56 (Billboard review on 9th Jun 56. BMI Clearance on 15th Jun 56)
45-HD-562-A - Slippin' Out - Stealing In
(R L Blythe / J M Alstatt) (Starrite BMI)
45-HD-562-B - Alone, Lonesome And Blue
(R L Blythe / J M Alstatt) (Starrite BMI)

Apparently, this artist became Sterling Blythe who recorded for Sage & Sand (can anybody confirm this?) A quick trawl through Billboard magazines found a few titbits on this artist. He was signed up to the KWKH Artist Services Bureau, run by Horace Logan, (booking mgr of the Louisiana Hayride), and around Feb 57 he was listed as one of the Hayride's personnel. By March 57 he was also appearing over KRBB (El Dorado, AR) on the King's Corrall Show. By then, he'd managed to get on the Starday main series with "What Will The Answer Be" / "Not Much" (#298) which was reviewed by Billboard on the 3rd of June that year. (They described the A side as a ..."highly effective weeper."

That description pretty much described the A side of this disc as well. Sterling's got a nice voice for these kind of songs, a little like Werly Fairburn in places. Flipside is a mid-tempo hillbilly number with nice steel and lead guitar with fiddle filling up the spaces behind the vocals. (I especially like the slight miss-fingering by the guitarist on the solo - makes my many mistakes with the Bandidos seem slightly less significant. Doesn't stop the guys yelling abuse at me when I make them though :-) (MC / Neil Scott)

Label Shots courtesy of PJ Tricker.
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STARDAY RECORDS 561



















STARDAY RECORDS 561
JIMMY JOHNSON
May 56 (BMI clearance on 18th May 56)
45-561-A - Woman Love
(Jack Rhodes) (Central Songs BMI)
45-561-B - All Dressed Up
(J Rhodes / D Carter / D Nalls) (Starrite BMI)

Born in 1930 in Smith County, Jimmy Johnson played guitar, fiddle and sang in Jack Rhodes Ramblers (sometimes known as the Lone Star Buddies). Whilst appearing on RD Hendon's Western Jamboree Club in Houston, he was approached and offered a recording contract by Solomon Kahal, who owned the local Freedom label. ("Salt Your Pillow Down" being recognised as a classic example of East Texas honky-tonk/hillbilly.) After a couple of sessions, Jack Rhodes got him signed up for Columbia records where he recorded some great tunes ("Eternity" & "Mama Loves Papa" being the best of the bunch.) Then the Korean war came along and Jimmy was drafted. He came back a changed man, haunted by what he experienced on that war torn peninsula. He married Billie Jo Spear's sister (Betty Lou), had three children and worked for a local oil drilling company, with all the hopes of cashing in on his Columbia recording contract fading rapidly.

Like Jerry Hanson, Jimmy was frequently found recording at Jack Rhodes's motel in Mineola, TX. For the session (recorded probably in March 56), Jimmy sang and played lead guitar, his wife on rhythm and Leon Hayes played an upright bass. Jack Rhodes mailed copy tapes to Cliffie Stone who had acetates made up for Ken Nelson, A&R supremo for Capitol Records. Whilst impatiently waiting for Ken to put the record out by somebody - hell, ANYBODY, Jack got 300 copies pressed up by Starday, who put it out on their custom series instead of on their main series (where, in my opinion, it belonged). "Woman Love" was eventually recorded by Gene Vincent, although it was "Be-Bop-A-Lula" that became the hit, which brought in some nice royalty checks for Rhodes.

Johnson recorded many demos for Jack Rhodes but quickly faded from musical history. (Some of these demos appear on the ACE CD "Gene Vincent Cut Our Songs" (ACD CDCHD 1018). He passed away on Jan 8th 1980.

"Woman Love" is a brooding shuffler with Jimmy's deep and urgent vocals grabbing most of the attention. "All Dressed Up" is the faster side (but not by much) with Leon & Betty Lou joining in on the choruses. Quite why Jimmy didn't go on to cut more records with that great voice of his is beyond me really. Still, I suppose cutting one of the most famous "Starday Customs" is something worth being remembered for. For a fuller (and better written I might add) history of this artist, go to www.pinegrovepress.com and look out for "Taking Off - Musical Journeys In The Southwest And Beyond" by Andrew Brown - an essential read for anybody remotely interested in the music from this musically fertile part of the US. (MC / PJ Tricker / Al Turner / Rob Finnis / Andrew Brown)

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Label Shots courtesy of Neil Scott.



Monday, 23 November 2009

STARDAY RECORDS 560




















STARDAY RECORDS 560
JERRY HANSON
May 56 (BMI clearance 15 Jun 56)
45-560-A - Cry
(Jack Rhodes / Jerry Hanson) (Starrite BMI)
45-560-B - I'm Doing All Right
(Jack Rhodes / Jerry Hanson) (Starrite BMI)

Unlike most of the artists who had a Starday Custom disc, I have a bushel of info on Jerry, mainly due to the excellent sleeve notes by Wayne Russell written for the Ace CD "Starday / Dixie Rockabilly Vol1" (Ace CDCHD 704). In 1954, he was appearing on the "Western Star Serenade" Hillbilly show out of Tyler, TX and somehow ended up at Jack Rhodes cozy little hotel out of Mineola, TX, where he probably cut these sides. Sometime later (or even perhaps earlier), Jerry cut a faster take which languished on the shelves until it was issued on "Gene Vincent Cut Our Songs" (ACE CDCHD 1018). (By the way, both CD's mentioned here are "Must Have In My Collection" musical quality about them!)

"Cry" is a nice song, more country than anything else and Jerry and Jack Rhodes were hoping to pitch it to a good and known country singer through Capitol Records. "I'm Doing All Right", on the other hand is a tight, moody rockabilly classic with a threadbare feel, fronted by Hanson's assured vocals. (I prefer this to the faster unissued cut which seems to lack the passion of the 45.) Although I can hear quite a few artists covering "Cry", Jerry OWNS the B side and I can't quite imagine anyone else covering the song as well as Hanson does.

Hanson later appears on Ed Manney's Bluebonnet & Manco labels (Both are good vocally, especially the Bluebonnet 45) and on Colpix (which I haven't heard yet.). And then ..... he disappears into thin air as far as I'm concerned. (MC / PJ Tricker / Al Turner / Neil Scott / Wayne Russell / Rob Finnis)





Label Shots courtesy of Neil Scott (who almost blew a blood vessel when he finally secured a copy.)




Sunday, 22 November 2009

STARDAY RECORDS 559



















STARDAY RECORDS 559
(Artist based around Arlington, VA)
DON OWENS and the Circle "O" Ranch Boys
May 56 (BMI clearance on 18th May 56)
45-559-A - Somethings You Cannot Change
(Owens) (Starrite BMI)
45-559-B - Adios Novia
(Owens) (Starrite BMI)



This Don Owens was a DJ who broadcasted over WARL (Arlington, VA)and he once appeared on a Jimmie Rogers Memorial Show with the likes of Hank Snow and Ernest Tubb. (Billboard lso mentioned that attendance was very good despite the almost torrential rain that poured from the heavens that day. He also appeared before the Pastore Senate Subcommittee in 1958, saying that " ... The strongest condemnation of rock & roll and country music comes from people who have never spent five minutes paying attention to it." (Good for him, although, as a DJ & musical director of Arlington's only country music station, I doubt if he was defending R&R - but still ... kudos to the man for speaking his ind in public.) A further tale from this artists was mentioned in Billboard in Oct 55 which states ... "Don Owens, WARL, Arlington, VA debuted a new ballad recently on one of his shows that was composed by a local detective and his prisoner. The unusual writing team got together when Detective Alvin Fuchsman picked up 24 year old Ted Borrelli of Hoboken, NJ on a vagrancy charge. Upon discovering that the prisoner had with him some 50 odd poems that he had written, the detective put music to a few, tape recorded one of them ("Underneath The Lamp Post") which was later played by Deejay Owens.

Sadly, Don Owens was killed when he fell asleep at the wheel of his car (this was the second, or third time he had fallen asleep at the wheel.) It is said this was due to the long hours as a DJ, and his TV Show.

Musically, Don almost talks his way through the A side instead of singing. It's a nice love song I guess and the band are excellent. Flip side is more of the same really. I could hear Hank Williams singing this song better. (MC / John Burton)



Label Shots courtesy of PJ Tricker.






SULLIVAN RECORDS 558

SULLIVAN RECORDS 558
(No known location)
THE LEWIS FAMILY
Apr 56
558-A - Did You Do What The Lord Said To Do
(No credits) (No publication info)
558-B - Wait a little long please Jesus
(No credits) (No publication info)

Like the previous entry, I know nothing about this disc. (MC)






SULLIVAN RECORDS 557

SULLIVAN RECORDS 557
(No known location)
THE LEWIS FAMILY
Apr 56
557-A - Lights In The Valley
(No credits) (No publication info)
557-B - My Jesus is the one
(No credits) (No publication info)

This and the next disc are yet another in a long line of blanks where info is concerned. The "Lewis Family" were a reasonably successful gospel band, but there may have been two different groups with the same name so I'm not sure which one is which - without hearing them and seeing the discs of course which, after 20 years, I'm still waiting to do. (MC)



H&C RECORDS 556

H and C RECORDS 556
Tulsa, OK
OKLAHOMA MELODY BOYS Vcl by Jearl Ritter
Apr 56 (BMI clearance on 18th May 56)
45-556-A - Wasted
(Goldie Hood) (Starrite BMI)
45-556-B - Your Heart And Mine
(Thelma Conrad / Goldie Hood) (Starrite BMI)
Nothing on this band. Possibly T Texas Tyler’s band that he used on some of his 4-Star recordings. Nothing again on Jearl Ritter or Goldie Hood (who penned both sides.) Both sides of the disc is pleasant hillbilly. MC
Label Shots courtesy of PJ Tricker.



Saturday, 21 November 2009

STARDAY RECORDS 555

STARDAY RECORDS 555
(Artist based possibly in Quincy, KY at time of release.)
LUKE GORDON Acc by C Smith and the Tennessee Haymakers.
Apr 56 (BMI clearance on 18th May 56)
45-555-A - Let This Kiss Bid You Goodbye
(Gordon) (Starrite BMI)
45-555-B - Baby's Gone
(Gordon) (Starrite BMI)
Another offering from Luke. The A side is more in the sad Hank Williams vein. Flipside is a superior country rocker with some fantastic lead guitar bubbling behind his vocals. (I wish I knew who the lead guitar player was). Luke’s got one of those voices I could listen to for hours; a cross between Hank Williams and Luke McDaniels. (MC)

Slightly Blurred Label Shots: Phillip Tricker



Thursday, 19 November 2009

STARDAY RECORDS 554

STARDAY RECORDS 554
(Artist based in OH at time of release)
MARTY LICKLIDER
Apr 56
45-554-A - Cold Hands, Warm Heart
(Licklider)    (Starrite BMI)
45-554-B - Our Anniversary Day
(Licklider)    (Starrite BMI)
Mr. Licklider was business manager, singer, guitarist and song writer for a band called the Fox Hunters. Marty was also a DJ on WICA (Ashabula, OH) in 1952. The Fox Hunters consisted of Marty, Buell Licklider (Marty's brother) on mandolin and bass fiddle, Andy Hill (Violin), Eddie Allen (Accordian) and Marty's son, Larry who also played a violin. Marty had at least one disc issued on Coral (64126) ("Down By The Missouri River" / "I Don't Want My Darlin' To Cry.") The A side of this disc is a very pleasant hillbilly bopper with good steel & lead guitar. Flip is a ballad about the joys of marriage. Billboard described this disc on the 28th April, 1956 as:- "Cold hands, Warm Heart" - Licklider, new to the label, has a deep voice and relaxed style that reminds the listener of the incomparable Ernest Tubb. He employs his voice to good advantage on this humorous, bouncy tune." "Our Anniversary Day" - "The singer portrays the feelings of a couple that has been happy in marriage for many years. A thoughtfully presented reading that many country deejays will want to program." (MC)

Label Shots courtesy of Al Turner

ARKANSAS RECORDS 553

ARKANSAS RECORDS 553
Box 336, Judsonia, AR
ALTON GUYON and his Boogie Blues Boys
Apr 56 (BMI clearance on 27th Jul 56)
45-553-A - River Boat Blues
(K Murphy / A Guyon)    (Starrite BMI)
45-553-B - Leave My Baby Alone
(K Murphy / A Guyon)    (Starrite BMI)
Tough as old boots hillbilly bopper, bordering on early rock-a-billy from Alton and his Boogie Blues Boys from Judsonia, Arkansas. According to the excellent sleeve notes by Wayne Russell on the CD listed below, about a year after this disc was pressed, Guyon’s manager sent Starday four more sides for consideration which were (sadly) rejected. Quite why they didn’t press these onto a Starday Custom is anybody’s guess. As an aside, the A side was recorded by Buddy Phillips for the CKM label from Bald Knob, AR, with the flip (Coffee Baby) also written by K Murphy and Alton. I wonder if this track is also one of the remaining unissued sides. Over to you, Ace Records!! By the way, the CD is a “Must Have” in any collection. (MC / Wayne Russell - Starday / Dixie Rockabilly Vol 2 - ACE CDCHD 708).

Below is an email sent to Mark Lee Allen.


Hello Mark,
 
Yes I am relative.  I am his granddaughter.  He had three children with his only wife Matlida B. Guyon.  His oldest daughter passed at 9 years old of cancer.  The other two children-one boy (my dad) and one more girl.  Unfortantely, we do not have any of his records.  We live in south Louisiana and everything was lost due to Hurricane Katrina.  I would love to receive copies of his 45s.  Another thing you may not know is that in the late 80's he had his voicebox removed due to throat cancer.  So, i can barely remember his voice.  The record I purchased from you is a Christmas gift to my dad. He passed away almost 10 years ago. I thought my dad would enjoy hearing his fathers voice again. 
 
My sister who was very envious of the fact that I found this record first went on a mission this weekend to find his other records.  I can ask her if she has found any copies.

Label Shots courtesy of Terry Gordon.


STARDAY RECORDS 552

LUCKY WRAY
Apr 56 (BMI clearance on 26th May 56)
ST-2421 - It's Music She Says
(Cindy Davis / Larry Stone) (Starrite BMI)
ST-2422 - Sick And Tired
(Cindy Davis / Joe Drew) (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 552
Lucky, Doug and the more famous sibling, Link hailed from North Carolina, although by the early 50’s they were playing in and around Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia. (Lucky (real name Vern) took the name lucky because of his luck at gambling). The original band were called Lucky Wray and the Lazy Pine Wranglers, playing mainly Country / Western / Hillbilly music. They worked mainly at the Fernwood Farms Dance Hall in Virginia. By 1955, they had renamed themselves Lucky Wray and the Palomino Ranch hands and had relocated to Washington, DC, which included Shorty Horton on bass. The track above (and the other two singles) were cut at Ben Alderman’s studio. The A side on this disc bops along with Links’ guitar to the fore and an unknown steel guitarist - a hillbilly bopper that’s almost Rock-A-Billy. Flip is more mainstream hillbilly with Vern in fine vocal form and nice harmonies in the chorus. Both sides sport a Starday matrix which makes me wonder if Starday were considering placing this in their main series instead of pressing it up as a custom. (MC / Link Wray - Missing Links Vol 1 - (Norton CED 210) - notes by Billy Millar).


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Label Shots: Neil Scott


MID WEST RECORDS 551

MID WEST RECORDS 551
MOWEE JOHNSON and his Rocky Mountain Boys

Apr 56 (BMI clearance on 13th Apr 56)
551-A - I Hope Tomorrow Never Comes
(Johnson) (Starrite)
551-B - What Am I Going To Do
(Johnson) (Starrite)
Wichita, KS

Yet again, another artist had slipped past my radar and vanished into that "Bermuda Triangle" of obscure artists. (MC)




Friday, 13 November 2009

STARDAY RECORDS 550

LUKE GORDON acc by C Smith and the Tenn Haymakers
Summer 56 (Billboard Review 7th Apr 56)
45-550-A - Goin' Crazy
(L Gordon)    (Starrite BMI)
45-550-B - Married Life
(L Gordon)    (Starrite BMI)
STARDAY RECORDS 550
Possible Location:- Quincy, KY
Here's the Starday version of the L and C disc Luke had issued previously. They are the same recordings, just reissued on the Starday label. (MC)

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Label Shots: Phil Tricker



L&C RECORDS 550

LUKE GORDON acc by C Smith and the Tenn Haymakers
Mar 56
45-550-A - Goin' Crazy
(L Gordon)    (Starrite BMI)
45-550-B - Married Life
(L Gordon)    (Starrite BMI)
L and C RECORDS 550
Washington, DC

Luke Gordon was born Gordon Brown in Quincy, Kentucky on Friday 15th April, 1932; and was next to the youngest of 6 boys and 2 girls. Luke started his music career on radio station WPAY in Portsmouth, Ohio with the Rhythm Rascals and became good friends with Zeke Mullins who was a DJ at WPAY. Luke served in the US. Army during the Korean Conflict and upon his discharge in 1953 he headed for Norfolk, Virginia where he met up with Jimmy Dean and did a show with him. He then went from there to Warrenton, Virginia with Jimmy and they won the 'Best Vocalist' at a JC contest. He also appeared on the 'Old Dominion Barn Dance in Richmond, Virginia. Luke then went to Tennessee and entertained the folks with Ray Price and The Western Cherokees.
After his stint in Tennessee he returned to Virginia and the Washington D.C. area to work with fiddler Curley Smith at radio station WGAY, Silver Springs, Maryland and do personal appearances. Curley set up a number of recording sessions for Luke with Ben Adelman and the result was released on L and C and STARDAY during 1956. Luke started his own QUINCY record label which was based in Quincy, Kentucky. He also appeared on ISLAND, BLUE RIDGE, EMPIRE and NASHVILLE amongst others. (The Quincy label better known for the barn storming “Rock Pretty Mama” by Billy Adams).

“Married Life” is a Luke The Drifter type monologue which bemoans how bad married life can be. I class this type of song as “Bar Room Advice”, the wisdom of an unhappily married man. (Then again, if they were so smart ....... ) “Goin’ Crazy” is a nice shuffling country ditty, supported by a fine lead guitarist. Dick Grant has just done an extensive interview with Luke so hopefully more info will follow., although, at the time of writing, it's been at least 8 years since Dick mentioned sending me the interview.

LABEL SHOTS: Kent Heineman and Lars Lundgren

RAMBLER RECORDS 549

CURLEY MONEY and the Rolling Ramblers
Mar 56 (BMI clearance 6th Apr 56)
45-549-A - Playing The Game
(Curley Money)    (Starrite BMI)
45-549-B - Why Must I Cry
(Curley Money / Ruth Sanders)    (Starrite BMI)
RAMBLER RECORDS 549
Columbus, GA
Unlike many of the artists in the Starday Custom series, Curley was quite a prolific artist, though this seems to be his only Starday pressing. Curley was born Robert Earnest Money in Halesburg, Alabama in March 1925, the youngest of eight children. Money was naturally musical and learned to play the fiddle early in life, followed by the guitar. He soon found music not only a pleasure but a way of making some much-needed income on the side, and in his teens he was playing locally at barn dances. He moved to Columbus in 1942 (age 17) and whilst labouring in the cotton mills, formed the Rhythm Ramblers - playing over WGBA and doing some TV appearances along with a string of one nighters across the state. By 1956, his ambition fuelled by years of gigs and radio, he formed RAMBLER Records which mainly released his own work. Later on he was forced to changed the label name to MONEY Records. As Colin Escott wrote in his sleeve notes for the Flat Git It Series: "...One of the artists he had signed in 1957 was Lee Mitchell, whom Money was apparently pushing with Sam Phillips at SUN, when he brought him to Memphis, sometime in the year after. He left behind a recording of his own, “Chain Gang Charlie,” that didn’t get heard by anyone until over three decades later, when it was found in the SUN vaults, but showed Curley Money doing perfectly respectable, even pretty hot rockabilly for a guy who was past 30 at a time when this music was still new. Money’s forays into rock & roll didn’t last, though his label did, into 1965, with 42 releases to its credit be- fore he closed it down that year…". Quite a few of his Rambler Record releases were pressed by RCA. The A side is a nice country bouncer, with guitar, steel guitar and sawing fiddles. Flip is a waltzy-little number. In 2003, Money was inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. He passed away later that year, at the age of 78.(MC / Bear Family CD 16210 - That’ll Flat Git It Vol. 14 - notes by Colin Escott)

Label Shots: Phil Tricker

GULF COAST RECORDS 548

TOMMIE TOLLESON and the Western Playboys from Palacios, Texas
Mar 56 (BMI clearance 23rd March 56)
45-548-A - Warm Springs Waltz
(Tolleson)    (Starrite BMI)
45-548-B - Think Of Me
(Tolleson)    (Starrite BMI)
GULF COAST RECORDS 548
Box 195, Palacios, TX
Just for a change, I have more info on this artist than I know what to do with, thanks to Adam Komorowski and Bobbie Brunes’ excellent and informative sleeve notes on the Tommie Tolleson CD - “A Boogie King From The Gulf Coast” on Collector Records CD-4498. Adam was editor of the UK New Kommotion magazine, so it’s always a good bet he’s done some top-notch research. So, if you need a fuller picture on this interesting artist, then grab yourself a copy from your nearest stockist.
Tommie was born on the 5th July 1936 - one of six children. Blind from an early age, he attended the Texas State School for the Blind (although Tommie could differentiate between day and night but not much more) which could boast other such luminaries as Leon Payne and Hub Sutter. Learning not only how to play but to tune a piano, he formed the Western Playboys to perform in bars when he was home from the school. Aged 19, this is his first record release - 300 copies pressed and another 100 shipped out to DJ’s , Radio Stations etc - the standard Starday Custom deal. Warm Springs Waltz was dedicated to the Warm Springs Foundation which was a cure centre. He was 22 when he graduated from the school and returned to Palacious, TX where he took up music pretty much full time. He recorded for Dan Menchuras’ KOOL label before operating his own record label - Gulfcoast Records - where he released polkas, waltzes, boogie woogie and the torrid rocker “Carla Blues” (Gulfcoast 101). He died April 23rd 1997. “Think Of Me” is a ballad whilst the flip has a cajun/waltz feel. Not as torrid as Carla Blues or A Gal Named Sue, but nevertheless a nice little tune. (MC / Adam Komorowski and Bobbie Brunes / Collector Records CD-4498)

Label Shots: Phil Tricker